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Persuasive Speech Example






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Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt,
so that you may know how you ought to answer each person. - Collosians 4:6

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Currently, there is no consensus on the number of bears in the greater Yellowstone region. The smallest population numbers put forth by the National Park Service estimate the bears at slightly over 600 animals with the population increasing annually. Other conservation organizations have even higher numbers of the animals. Many conservationists feel the increasing population base in addition to current numbers is sufficient to ensure the continued survival of the species. Taking the grizzly off the endangered species list will no longer prove detrimental to the future of the bears.

Secondly, grizzly bears are currently re-establishing territories in areas outside the delineated Yellowstone ecosystem. As the bears' population increases, younger bears are forced further into the non-protected lands surrounding Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Glacier National Parks. This migration brings bears and people into closer proximity increasing the chances of conflict. The lands surrounding these parks have seen a tremendous increase in human population during the past twenty years and officials only expect that trend to continue. As bears and people move into these areas the likelihood of potentially fatal conflicts is bound to increase. When bears get into trouble, they often end up dead. If current levels of bear populations were maintained fewer bears would move into inhabited regions, keeping them out of trouble.

Finally, delisting grizzly bears would revert management of the species from federal agencies back to the states. Each state could define a critical population level, then use methods such as hunting to keep numbers in check. Since grizzly bears have not been hunted in over 30 years, there is no memory within the collective bear population that humans could pose a possible threat. Currently, grizzlies only perceive humans as a threat to their young or a food source. This population of grizzlies has never been shot at except by tranquilizer gun or for a forced removal after a fatal human/bear conflict. If hunting seasons were established, grizzlies might develop a more fearful connotation of humans. This has the potential to reduce future bear attacks.

In conclusion, I believe grizzly bears should be taken off the endangered species list for the protection of both the human and bear populations which share the same ecosystem. There are more bears in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem than the area can support. This results in bears moving away from protected lands. It is possible to maintain a viable population of bears with the current numbers of animals. Unless bears are removed from the Endangered Species List and numbers maintained at current levels, the amount of human/bear conflicts will only increase. More conflicts means more possible fatalities for both bears and humans. That is a no-win situation.


Persuasive Speech Example Notes



(1) The speech opens with the statement that’s being argued for.  The very first sentence of the speech indicates what the speaker is going to argue for.  This is called a strong opening and is much preferred to a cliché like “Thank you so much for the opportunity…” etc.  Get straight into your content by starting strong!

(2) The speech has a logical outline. The speech starts with an introduction, has three points of argument, and finishes with a conclusion.  If you want to get your audience sleeping, make your outline incomprehensible.  But if you want them to pay attention, follow a logical outline that makes sense and is easy to follow.  This speech provides a good example of just that.

(3) The speech gives sufficient background on the topic.  Never assume that your audience knows all about the topic you’re going to be talking about.   Just because you’ve been researching and reading up on it, does not mean everybody else has.  Be sure to provide sufficient background to ensure you audience is on the same page as you, before continuing with the rest of your speech.

(4) The speech employs logos as a means of persuasion.  Point number two in the speech uses logic to argue for the case.  This called logos and you can read all about logos as a means of persuasion here.

(5) The speech employs pathos as a means of persuasion.  Point number three in the speech uses a brief emotional appeal (when it’s talking about reducing bear attacks) to argue for the case.  This called pathos and you can read all about pathos as a means of persuasion here.

(6) The persuasive speech example concludes well. Finally, the delivery ends by restating its original claim and briefly summarizing its key points - this is a good way to conclude a persuasive speech.
If you need to give a debate or argumentative essay/delivery, then the persuasive speech example on this page will by giving you a good overview of what exactly such a speech should include, and how to use persuasion effectively.
Grizzly Bear in a Persuasive Speech
Read through the full-length, individually researched and written persuasive speech example below, and then see the notes and analyzes after that, where I've lifted out the key highlight so that you can incorporate them into your own speech.


Persuasive Speech Example

I believe grizzly bears should be taken off the endangered species list. For the protection of the bears and humans I believe this is the best action to take. In this speech I will discuss three reasons why I feel the bears should be removed from federal protection.
Grizzlies are historical inhabitants of the western half of the North American continent. As the human population expanded, grizzlies were pushed further and further west. Unlike black bears that can exist in close conjunction with people, grizzlies need larger areas of wilderness for survival.

Grizzly bears were eventually pushed into the western mountains of the United States. Continued hunting pressure and loss of habitat resulted in such a diminished population that grizzlies were placed on the endangered species list in 1975. Recovery efforts boosted numbers and the bears were de-listed in 2007. However lawsuits from conservation groups forced the re-listing of the species in 2009.